Ripple Effects Episode 3: Eagle County

Eagle County residents understand the importance of a healthy, flowing river for their community and for support of their way of life including summer and winter recreation, clean drinking water, and the County’s essential agricultural heritage. Tune into Episode 3 of Ripple Effects to learn more.

Colorado River Ranch on the Colorado River | Photo by Ken Neubecker

Join us for Episode 3 of Ripple Effects, a look into how Eagle County, Colorado connects with and depends upon their local rivers including the Eagle, Upper Colorado and Roaring Fork.

Eagle County is known for its amazing landscape and iconic rivers that make up the two prominent valleys in the County – the Eagle Valley and the Roaring Fork Valley. Eagle County is Home to the Gore Range, thousands of acres of pastoral farm and ranch land, a popular reach of the Upper Colorado River, part of the Roaring Fork and the entirety of the Eagle River. Residents and tourists alike are drawn to the amazing landscapes of Eagle County.

Local residents and the economy of Eagle County is deeply tied to its rivers. Historically, water was needed in the valley to support the county’s economic engine – agriculture. Today, Eagle County’s rivers not only support farming and ranching but also a vibrant recreation economy in both the summer and the winter. River based recreation including paddling, fishing, running, hiking or picnicking alongside local rivers is a hot commodity in the summer. In the wintertime, Eagle County’s rivers supply water needed for snowmaking in the many ski resorts across the County.

Earlier this year, I chatted with Eagle County Commissioner Kathy Chandler-Henry and Diane Mauriello who is the Director of Eagle County Open Space. Both agreed that rivers are vitally important to the communities within Eagle County – in both the Eagle and Roaring Fork Valleys. Here is what Commissioner Chandler-Henry had to say about the importance of rivers to her community:

“The rivers in Eagle County are the lifeblood of our communities.  They sustain our wildlife, irrigate our crops, and provide water for summer play and for snowmaking in the winter.  Our rivers define us.”

It’s clear from Commissioner Chandley-Henry, that like many other river towns and communities in Colorado, residents of Eagle County are both dependent on and committed to their rivers. The local communities have protected important riverside lands, restored reaches of rivers and streams, conserved pastoral working landscapes and provided recreational access to the different bodies of water throughout the county.

Eagle County residents understand the importance of a healthy, flowing river for their community. Rivers in Eagle County support the region’s way of life including summer and winter recreation, clean drinking water, and the County’s essential agricultural heritage.

The rivers and streams that flow through Eagle County are part of the region’s iconic landscape. It’s clear that residents and decision makers in Eagle County are committed to protecting and preserving these resources that are vital for their way of life. Join us for Episode 3 of Ripple Effects to hear more about the thriving Eagle County and the many ways residents and tourists alike benefit from their healthy, flowing rivers.

One response to “Ripple Effects Episode 3: Eagle County

  1. I would like to see more information about fertilizers and other chemicals finding their way into our rivers. I live near Kimberly Oregon and the country looks quite similar to the above picture. i am constantly flabbergasted by the flood irrigation used on many fields in this vicinity. It’s not only polluting the waters, but also extremely wasteful. More education is needed to get farmers and ranchers to use wheel lines and pivots, and only use them at night. We find that our fields produce just as much doing that as the flood irrigation users.

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