Oregon and California (“O&C”) Lands

click image to view full infographic The future of 2.6 million acres of high value public forest lands is at risk. Managed mainly by the Bureau of Land Management in Oregon known as Oregon and California (“O&C”) lands [PDF], these forests are home to perhaps the highest concentrations of pristine wild rivers in the United… Read more »

Saving Salmon on the White River in Washington

Today’s guest blog about the #8 White River in Washington- a part of our America’s Most Endangered Rivers® series- is from Dave Seabrook. Dave is a long-time salmon recovery activist in Tacoma, Washington, and a founding board member of the Puyallup Watershed Coalition. Tell the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to fix the dam and modernize… Read more »

Help Thank Our Wild and Scenic River Champions

Sen. Murray and Congressman Reichert at press event after introducing legislation | Thomas O’Keefe Last November I wrote about what gratitude meant to me and how I would be forever grateful if Congress were to pass legislation for new Wild and Scenic River designations for Washington State. Well…the River Gods must have been listening! In… Read more »

Running with a boy: story behind our Northwest Rivers video

Credit: Skip Armstrong Sometimes the best way to experience a river is through a child’s eyes. Our video following eight year old Parker as he runs and splashes along the wild rivers of the Pacific Northwest has gotten more than 375,000 views. People love the video because it reminds them of their own childhood, and… Read more »

Envisioning a Restored Klamath River

Updated January 2007 Debates over restoration of river ecosystems can become contentious and polarizing: residents in an area faced with river management decisions may have a deep-rooted concern about large-scale landscape change, and fear of the unknown.  People are often unsure what the impacts of restoration might look like, and what the consequences could be… Read more »

The Natural Water Filter: A Case For A Protected O&C Forest

Download the full O&C infographic Simply put, forests serve as low-cost natural water treatment plants. Healthy, intact forests filter pollutants, sediment, and harmful bacteria out of the water, providing high quality drinking water. They also act like a sponge, holding and gradually releasing water, recharging groundwater, and even reducing flood damage downstream. As Congress considers… Read more »