Take Action For Your Rivers

Contacting government officials is one of the best ways to help protect your rivers. Add your voice to thousands of other activists across the US to help create real change for our environment.

Current Actions

Old Oil Pipelines Are Threatening Your Clean Water

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A rupture in the Bridger Pipeline company’s Poplar Pipeline on January 17 dumped an estimated 40,000 gallons of oil into the Yellowstone River in eastern Montana, contaminating drinking water supplies for local residents and harming the river’s fish and wildlife. This is the second major pipeline spill in the Yellowstone River in less than four years.

Tell Governor Hickenlooper to Protect The Yampa

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Drought and increased demand are putting further strain on Colorado Basin water supplies, and with proposals for new dams and trans-basin diversions, the future of the Yampa hangs in the balance.

Tell Congress: Stop Blocking The EPA From Protecting Our Clean Water

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Right now, corporate lobbyists for building construction, oil and gas, and factory farm interests are putting pressure on Members of Congress to block the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Army Corps of Engineers’ efforts to restore long-standing protections under the Clean Water Act.

Tell Stanford to Remove Searsville Dam

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Searsville Dam was completed in 1892, one year after the founding of Stanford University. The dam blocks a unique creek, creating a stagnant reservoir that is 90% full of sediment. Stanford could replace the little water provided by Searsville Dam through modifications to existing water diversion facilities.

Protect the Grand Canyon for Everyone

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The New York Times recently spotlighted two major development proposals that would devastate the canyon’s wild nature, beauty, and overall health. These projects would harm a national treasure, a wild place essential to our identity as Americans. Sign the petition opposing this unprecedented level of development.

Stop Megaloads from Degrading One of America’s First Wild & Scenic River Corridors!

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The Wild & Scenic designated Middle Fork Clearwater and Lochsa rivers are threatened by the oil industry’s desire to convert U.S. Highway 12 into an industrial transport route for massive loads of oil processing equipment. Tell the U.S. Forest Service to protect the special values of these Wild & Scenic rivers by saying NO to megaload shipments through the river corridor.

Protect Healthy Flows in the Edisto River

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The Edisto River is America’s longest free-flowing blackwater river. The river is home to gamefish, endangered sturgeon, swallow-tailed kite, and other magnificent fish and wildlife. But excessive agriculture withdrawals threaten the river’s health and downstream water users, including other farmers. Tell SC’s governor and General Assembly to ensure healthy flows for the Edisto and all of SC’s rivers by requiring agricultural users to comply with the same rules as industrial and municipal users.

New Madrid Levee Would be a Disaster for the Mississippi River

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A proposed new levee would cut off the river from the floodplains that protecting downstream communities from floodwaters and provide habitat for fish and wildlife. Tell the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to abandon the levee project and the Environmental Protection Agency to veto it if the Corps proceeds with this ill-conceived plan.

Protect Birmingham’™s Drinking Water from Coal Mine Pollution

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The Black Warrior River is a valuable resource for drinking water, recreation, fishing, and rare fish and wildlife. However, the river’s Mulberry Fork is threatened by the Shepherd Bend Mine, which would discharge polluted wastewater only 800 feet from a major drinking water intake. To mine the proposed area leases must be obtained leases from the University of Alabama. The University must permanently refuse to sell or lease its land and mineral rights at Shepherd Bend for coal mining.