Protecting Tennessee’s Hatchie River

This is a guest post by Belinda Sellari, who is a member of the Hatchie Sentinels Sign the Petition Don’t Dump Pollutants In The Hatchie River! TDEC proposes to approve the Brownsville Energy permit using rules which allow “small amounts” of pollutants to be discharged into a river without a review. This is a terrible… Read more »

Why are We Irrigating in Places With too Much Water?

Today’s post is a guest blog by Craig Colten. Craig is professor of geography at LSU, Director of Human Dimensions at the Water Institute of the Gulf, and author of Southern Waters: The Limits to Abundance. I was driving across eastern Virginia toward the Dismal Swamp a couple of years ago, and I spotted yet… Read more »

Water Efficiency Can Save the Southeast Over $700 million and New Water Supply for Over One Million Residents

Report available at www.AmericanRivers.org/WaterEfficiencyReport Atlanta — The Southeast can save over $700 million and new water supply for over one million residents by embracing water efficiency solutions like stopping leaks and upgrading old buildings.  That’s according to the new report, Hidden Reservoir: Why Water Efficiency is the Best Solution for the Southeast by American Rivers,… Read more »

Removal of Steeles Mill Dam Begins on Hitchcock Creek

Raleigh, NC —Hitchcock Creek, a tributary of the Pee Dee River, will soon flow freely thanks to the removal of the 110 year old Steeles Mill Dam. The dam removal marks the beginning of a renaissance for Hitchcock Creek, and is emblematic of a river restoration trend in North Carolina and nationwide. The dam removal… Read more »

The most anti-environmental piece of legislation in history

Just after 4:30 a.m. this past Saturday, the U.S. House of Representatives passed arguably the most anti-environmental piece of legislation in history.  H.R. 1, which would fund the government through the rest of federal Fiscal Year 2011, eviscerates programs that protect our drinking water, clean up polluted rivers, and safeguard land and wildlife for future generations…. Read more »

Coosa River Named One of America’s Most Endangered Rivers for 2010

Washington, DC — Hydropower dams have already caused a mass extinction of wildlife on the Coosa River, and unless dam operations change, the South will lose even more of its priceless natural heritage on the Coosa. This threat landed the Coosa River in the number ten spot in America’s Most Endangered Rivers™: 2010 edition, produced by… Read more »

Saluda River among America’s Most Endangered Rivers

Washington— Clean water and quality of life will be increasingly at risk unless sewage pollution in the Saluda River is reduced. This threat landed the Saluda in the number six spot in America’s Most Endangered Rivers: 2009 edition. The Saluda provides drinking water for more than 500,000 people, is a hotspot for recreation, and contributes… Read more »

Early Successes on Chicago and Roanoke Rivers

It has been an exciting couple of weeks since the release of our 2011 list of America’s Most Endangered Rivers™!  Things seem to be looking up for the Chicago and Roanoke Rivers.  While both rivers still have a ways to go, I wanted to share with you the recent developments. Chicago River The week prior… Read more »

Hurricane Irene Underscores Need For Better Preparation

Over the past week Mother Nature has done a fine job of reminding those of us on the East Coast that she’s the one that’s really in charge. Between the earthquake that shocked us all, and Hurricane Irene still wreaking havoc as it moves up the east coast, we’re reminded that as much as we… Read more »

New Bipartisan Report Endorses Blue Trails

Several months ago we blogged about a report released by the Outdoor Resources Review Group that supports American Rivers’ vision of creating a nationwide system of blue trails. Blue trails are the water equivalent to hiking trails. They link together communities and provide families opportunities to have fun outside, not to mention invaluable services like… Read more »