How Long Does It Take to Remove a Dam?

Veazie Dam Breach | Cheryl Daigle, Penobscot River Restoration Trust We are often asked how long it takes to remove a dam. The answer is: it depends on the project. Project complexity, cost, and the regulatory environment all can play a role in the duration of a project. Sometimes even a great project can become… Read more »

7 Challenges That Can Delay River Restoration Projects

This blog is a part of our series this month on River Restoration Challenges. River restoration projects are multi-stage projects, including project design, permitting, construction, and monitoring. Projects can also contain multiple components, such as the removal of a dam or other barrier, riparian corridor improvements, or water trail creation. Each stage can present issues… Read more »

It’s Time to Move On From Teton Dam

Remnants of the Teton Dam | Scott Bosse The catastrophic failure of the Teton Dam in eastern Idaho 38 years ago this month will forever be remembered as a turning point that helped bring our nation’s modern dam-building era to an end. The disaster took 11 lives, killed 20,000 head of livestock, and caused $2… Read more »

Autopsy of a Dam Removal: Stearns Dam

Stearns Dam, During Construction, Crooked River, OR | Denise Hoffert-Hay This blog is a part of our ongoing series this month on the Challenges of River Restoration. One of our goals at American Rivers is to make dam removal accessible— to make it something that local watershed groups, state natural resource agencies, and others feel… Read more »

Another Look at Dam Removal: Searsville Dam

San francisquito, CA Searsville Dam | Matt Stoecker As part of our River Restoration Challenges Series this month, today I am talking about overcoming obstacles in order to remove the Searsville Dam on San Francisquito Creek in California. Over the last 10 years, a coalition of environmental groups, including American Rivers, has asked Stanford University… Read more »

Some River Restoration Projects Are Worth The Wait

John C. Boyle Dam, Klamath River | American Rivers Throughout the month of June, we will be talking on our blog and social media about the challenges that we face when doing river restoration projects around the country. In some cases, restoration work is fairly straightforward and follows a relatively predictable timeline. However, sometimes unexpected circumstances may… Read more »

Musings on the Migratory Fish of the Week: Lamprey

Adult Sea Lamprey | USFWS World Fish Migration Day is coming up on Saturday (5/24)! Are you ready? If not, maybe these writings on lamprey will help you along. First, we have a poem by one of American Rivers’ partners, Tim Watts, about Cohannet. “Cohannet” is the Native American name given to the first falls on… Read more »

Recovering Atlantic Coast Migratory Fish Populations

Today we have a guest blog from Dr. R. Wilson Laney, Senior Biologist in Fisheries and Ecological Services with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Raleigh, North Carolina. In Celebration of World Fish Migration Day on May 24, Dr. Laney discusses the need to recover migratory fish species in the U.S. Atlantic Sturgeon |… Read more »

Intertwined Lives: Migratory Fish and Freshwater Mussels

Lampsilis reeveiana lure | MC Barnhart Migratory fish and freshwater mussels have more in common than you might think. Each have unique life cycles and depend on clean, free flowing water to thrive. Migratory fish spend time both in freshwater streams and in the ocean. Some species, like herring, live in the ocean and reproduce… Read more »

Ten Blogs about Migratory Fish You Might Have Missed

Alewives | The Nature Conservancy To celebrate World Fish Migration Day later this month, we’ve been blogging about all things migratory fish. So far we’ve written about the economic benefits of restoring river herring, asked whether fish can climb ladders, and provided a few fast facts about migratory species. But we have been blogging about… Read more »