Step 2—Understand Co-benefits

The path to integrating systems of water management is rooted in an understanding of the issues that exist beyond one’s own sector. Identifying the intersections is essential to pursuing solutions that provide multiple benefits. Trade-offs are necessary, but decision-making is made easier with an improved understanding.

Resources:

American Rivers—Why Do We Need Healthy Rivers? (2016)

Short introduction to the benefits of rivers, from safe clean drinking water, to the economic benefits of recreation, this hits the high points and links to further reading. 1 page. Easy reading level. Read More…

Climate Interactive—10 Strategies for Capturing Multiple Benefits in Climate Action Plans (2016)

Uses the idea of ‘multisolving’, or solving multiple problems at once, to think about how to leverage maximum capacity across sectors to identify solutions with the maximum benefit. Focused on climate change, but extremely applicable for water management. 2 pages. Easy reading level. Read More…

Clean Water America Alliance—What’s Water Worth? (2010)

An exploration of the personal, social, industrial, agricultural, ecological, and institutional perspectives on the value of water and examined the economic, environmental and social consequences of continuing to undervalue the asset. Thoughts and insights from a national dialogue of leading water managers from the corporate, government, and non-profit sectors. 20 pages. Intermediate reading level. Read More…

American Rivers—Putting Green to Work: Economic Recovery Investments for Clean and Reliable Water (2009)

Introduces the idea of ‘bright green’ infrastructure—projects that protect, restore or replicate natural function or that create real reductions in water use, and provide additional benefits. Advocates for expanding the Green Project Reserve to meet demand for GSI projects, and for focusing the funding on the types of projects that maximize multiple benefits. 24 pages. Intermediate reading level. Read More…