Step 1—Identify the Problem

Water management in the United States is in a state of flux, due in part to patterns of human growth, outdated methods of water management, and climate change. It’s not just technology that’s changing, but also psychology. Every problem a water manager faces is also opportunity, and an ideal entry point into the IWM process.

Resources:

Mukheiber, C. Howe, and D. Gallet—What’s getting in the way of a “One Water” approach to water services planning and management? (2014)

Proposes that the primary barrier to integration is inertia associated with the dominant paradigm of centralized and systems in separate silos, and the complex regulatory environment. Elaborates on some of these challenges and potential solutions without getting lost in the details. 6 pages. Easy reading level. Read More…

Global Water Partnership—Integrated Urban Water Management: Towards Diversification and Sustainability (2013)

Key messages about the need, nature, and economics of integrated urban water management. Concludes with eight policy recommendations. 5 pages. Easy reading level.  Read More…

Clean Water America Alliance—A Call to Action: The Need for an Integrated National Water Policy (2009)

A call for a national water policy based on sustainability. Examines the details of how such a policy would address pressing issues such as the energy/water nexus, water quality and water quantity, green infrastructure, and watersheds. 20 pages. Intermediate reading level.  Read More…