A world without rivers

Dry river bed in the Sierra Nevada of CA | Austen Lorenz Imagine a world without rivers. No digging in with your raft paddle as you shoot rapids. No guiding a canoe quietly downstream. No diving into deep river pools or standing in the mist of a waterfall. No casting fly lines into flowing water… Read more »

Can the Colorado Water Plan work?

Fishing the Upper Colorado | Sinjin Eberle In a recent 5280 magazine article, Kate Siber asked, “Can a Water Plan Actually Work”? At times she came close, but never really answered her own question. The answer is a solid “it all depends”. The Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB) Director James Ecklund and his staff have put… Read more »

Oil Spill Cleanups are a Myth

As someone who lived through the worst oil spill disaster in American history, I’m going to tell you an unpleasant truth – oil spill cleanups are a myth. Ice-covered Yellowstone River near Glendive, MT a week after the oil spill | Scott Bosse I was among the thousands of workers who were hired to clean up… Read more »

Stanford on Verge of Momentous Dam Decision

The 60 foot Searsville Dam from below | Matt Stoecker After 15 years of pushing by American Rivers and partners such as Beyond Searsville Dam (BSD), Stanford University could finally start taking responsibility for the harm its water system causes to endangered steelhead trout and local streams. For over 100 years, Stanford has operated multiple… Read more »

Planning for growth – respect or diminish Colorado’s rivers?

Upper Colorado | Ken Neubecker Governor Hickenlooper recently received the initial draft of the Colorado Water Plan.  This “plan” has been in the making since the drought year of 2002, and it’s not over yet.  Work on the Plan, including public input, will continue through the coming year, with the Final version due to the… Read more »

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Wants to Protect Arctic Refuge Wild Rivers

Hulahula River, Alaska | © Judith Slein (flickr) This week the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recommended designating 278 miles of four major wild rivers in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska, the Atigun, Marsh Fork of the Canning, the Kongakut and, the Hulahula, as Wild and Scenic Rivers.  The agency found six additional… Read more »

Celebrating another year on the Edisto River

Today’s blog is a guest post by Hugo Krispyn. Friends of the Edisto | Heather C. Clarkson If we’re not exactly a family, we are at least a community, and the Edisto is the tie that connects us. Walking past the registration table and down the hill to the meeting tent at the Friends of… Read more »

The Klamath and Killer Whales

Algae bloom behind Klamath dam | James Norman The rivers of the Pacific Coast once teemed with wild salmon, providing nourishment for humans, wildlife, and ecosystems from the mountains to the sea—including many communities of orca whales. But for the last century, dams, habitat loss, and excessive harvest have pushed salmon to the brink. Dams… Read more »

What’s Happening With the Ski Industry’s Bill

Last March, the House of Representatives voted to approve a bill that could dry up countless stretches of rivers and harm river restoration efforts nationwide. H.R. 3189 – the so-called “Water Rights Protection Act” – passed by a 238-174 vote. This bill would put the special interests of the oil and gas industry and Big… Read more »

Wave of Public Support for Protecting the Grand Canyon

The New York Times is running this story by Adam Nagourney today, highlighting significant threats facing the Grand Canyon, one of our country’s greatest national treasures. The story examines the Escalade tram development that could carry as many as 10,000 visitors a day from the canyon rim down to the confluence of the Colorado and… Read more »