A Growing Mine is a Growing Problem for the Russell Fork River

The Russell Fork River is threatened by a new coal mine. A bankruptcy saga with the mine’s owner had stalled development in the past year, but things appear to be getting back on track.

Breaks Park along the Russell Fork River

Guest post by Erin Savage is a part of our America’s Most Endangered Rivers® series spotlighting the Russell Fork River.

The history of the Doe Branch Mine in Southwest Virginia is long and complicated, and its future remains unclear.

The mine is owned by Paramont Coal Company, once a subsidiary of Alpha Natural Resources. Until recently, Alpha was one of the largest mining companies in the country, but is now emerging from bankruptcy. The Doe Branch Mine started with plans for a 245-acre surface coal mine in 2005, but it now has the potential to grow to 1,100 acres. If the current plan moves forward, the mine would include five valley fills and 14 wastewater discharges that would drain into tributaries of the Russell Fork River — a renowned resource in the region for river recreation and the star attraction of the Breaks Interstate Park.

The Doe Branch Mine and watershed connections to the Russell Fork River
The Doe Branch Mine and watershed connections to the Russell Fork River.

While there is a long history of coal mining in the Russell Fork watershed, water quality in the river has improved over the last several decades due to better regulations and the watchful eye of local residents. At a time when coal mining is declining in Appalachia, the Doe Branch mine is among the largest mines still being pursued in Southwest Virginia, and it would undoubtedly lead to significant water quality impacts.

The mine is also part of a large, controversial highway construction project known as the Coalfields Expressway. Some believe the Expressway will bring much needed economic development opportunities to the region, but others believe it unnecessarily enables additional surface mining and does not adequately consider what is best for nearby communities. Though a portion of the Doe Branch mine has been approved by state and federal agencies, the expansion does not have final approval. Little work has been started on any portion of the mine over the last decade, beyond some tree clearing.

In 2012, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued an objection to the company’s application to increase the size of the mine. Specifically, the EPA objected to the application for additional wastewater permits under the Clean Water Act. The wastewater would be discharged into several tributaries of the Russell Fork that are already impaired by mining-related pollutants, according to Virginia’s list of impaired waterways. In order to secure discharge permits, the company must show that it will not increase the overall impairment of the watershed.

Trends for coal mining production in Central Appalachia. This decline has continued into 2015 and 2016.
Trends for coal mining production in Central Appalachia. This decline has continued into 2015 and 2016.

Since hitting its peak in 2008, coal production in Central Appalachia has declined precipitously. Alpha’s dominance in the Central Appalachian coal market has not shielded it from the economic downturn. The company declared bankruptcy in August 2015, creating a lull in the Doe Branch permit application process.

On July 26, 2016, Alpha announced its emergence from Chapter 11 bankruptcy. The plan to emerge from bankruptcy involves the formation of two new companies. One is a privately held, smaller Alpha, which will retain most of the Central Appalachian mines. The other is Contura Energy, formed by Alpha’s senior lenders, which purchased Alpha’s Wyoming, Pennsylvania and better-performing Central Appalachian mines. Doe Branch is included in the short list of Central Appalachian mines that Contura will own.

Before emerging from bankruptcy, Alpha stated that the Doe Branch mine is not part of its 10 year plan. Now that Contura owns Doe Branch, the mine may be more likely to move forward. Just last month, a new Clean Water Act permit draft was issued by the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy. This new draft may be an attempt to address the objections raised by the EPA. Given the importance of the Russell Fork, the damage already done to its tributaries by mining, and the need for a serious economic shift in the region, the EPA should uphold its objection to this mine. Urge them to do so now.


Erin Savage, Appalachian VoicesErin Savage is the Central Appalachian Campaign Coordinator for Appalachian Voices. Appalachian Voices is an environmental non-profit committed to protecting the land, air and water of the central and southern Appalachian region, focusing on reducing coal’s impact on the region and advancing their vision for a cleaner energy future.

10 responses to “A Growing Mine is a Growing Problem for the Russell Fork River

  1. This region has long been abused by the greed of coal barons. It’s time to save the Russell Fork, the Breaks, and safe water for future generations to enjoy.

  2. It is hard to believe that humans can make the decisions that will harm our mountains, streams and our future generations for MONEY!!!! Please do not further the destruction , we only have this earth to live on!!!

  3. Please don’t allow this water system to be polluted by greedy BIG COAL. History always repeats itself, coal destroys absolutely.

  4. I have never seen this particular river as I live in the West. But I cannot understand how any Corporation would have the right to chop off the top of a mountain just to reach the coal beneath. The mountains have such value just as they are, and the damage that is done when they start destroying them is unacceptable!!! In addition, coal is no longer an acceptable fuel! These people are crazy!

  5. It’s way past time to end dirty, filthy coal energy. In all the centuries we’ve used coal, no real improvements have been made to clean it up. It’s a disaster from the moment it’s begun to be mined until it’s actual use. Destruction of our earth, gross pollution of our waters, horrible working conditions for humans (and once animals), wildlife’s homes destroyed, air so filthy you can’t breath, it stinks. I think I could write more for another hour. End this NOW!!!

  6. Still mining coal? Really?? Why does our government and the weak-kneed EPA still allow this horror? Because the CEOs of the coal-mining industry pay our politicians handsomely to allow this scourge on the Earth.

  7. This region has long been abused by the greed of coal barons. It’s time to save the Russell Fork, the Breaks, and safe water for future generations to enjoy.

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