Colorado River – America’s Most Endangered River 2013

The Colorado River is a lifeline in the desert, its water sustaining tens of millions of people in 7 states, as well as endangered fish and wildlife. However, demand on the river’s water now exceeds its supply, leaving the river so over-tapped that it no longer flows to the sea. (Video by Pete McBride.)

Hydropower Reform Can Save Rivers

American Rivers and our partners have worked to improve the operation of the many hydropower projects around the country, creating benefits for the river’s health, fish, and anglers.

Deschutes River Success!

American Rivers and our partners worked to improve the operation of the Pelton Round Butte hydropower project on the Deschutes River in Oregon, creating benefits for the river’s health, fish, and anglers.

Muskegon River Success!

A great success story out of Michigan, where we worked with our partners to improve dam operations on the Muskegon River. Check our video feed for the other films in this success series about the Deschutes River and the Saluda River!

Saluda River Success!

American Rivers is helping secure key clean water protections for South Carolina’s Saluda River through the hydropower dam relicensing effort.

American Rivers – An Overview

Learn how American Rivers works to restore and protect America’s rivers to ensure clean water, healthy rivers and communities, and great places for recreation like kayaking and rafting as well as fishing.

One Drop: Why We Need Green Roofs

Many communities are embracing a new approach to managing runoff that focuses on capturing rainfall and preventing it from polluting surrounding waterways. By using green infrastructure techniques such as green roofs, rain gardens, tree planting, and permeable pavement, they are managing stormwater problems at a lower cost and realizing a wide range of other benefits from reduced air pollution, energy use, and urban heat island effect to improved wildlife habitat and aesthetics.

Year of the River

The final video of our Year of the River series, this film tells the story of historic dam removal successes on Washington’s Elwha and White Salmon rivers. The seven-minute film premiered at the Wild and Scenic Film Festival in January and is the final installment in the “Year of the River” series by filmmaker Andy Maser.

Year of the River: Elwha part 2

The third video in our Year of the River series, this film gives background on the historic Elwha River conservation success, and introduces us to two advocates, Rick Rutz and Shawn Cantrell, who helped make it happen. Special thanks to oarsman Bruce McGlenn for getting us down the river.

Condit Dam explosion, White Salmon River Restoration

Condit Dam explosion, White Salmon River Restoration
Wednesday, October 26, 2011. American Rivers worked for more than 10 years with our partners to lead the effort to remove the 95-year old, 125-foot Condit dam and restore the White Salmon River. The White Salmon flows from its origin on the slopes of Mt. Adams to its confluence with the Columbia River. Portions of the river are protected as Wild and Scenic and are part of the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area. Removal of the dam began with a breach draining the reservoir on October 26, 2011, and will allow the White Salmon River to once again be home to abundant wild salmon and steelhead runs, restoring access to about 33 miles of habitat for steelhead and 14 miles of habitat for chinook.