New Federal Guidelines for Water Projects Give Overdue Recognition of Need for New Approach

March 22nd, 2013

Eileen Fretz, American Rivers, (570) 856-1128
Amy Kober, American Rivers, (503) 708-1145

Washington - American Rivers today welcomed the release of the Obama Administration’s updated federal guidelines for water infrastructure investments.
 
Bob Irvin, President of American Rivers, made the following statement:
 
“The new guidelines are a long overdue recognition that the old ways of treating our nation’s rivers are insufficient for the demands of the 21st century.  The old guidelines relegated concerns about environmental protection, river health, and sustainable water management to a minor role in federal decision-making.  For years American Rivers has called for revised guidelines that implement a more balanced approach to federal investments in water infrastructure.  We have called for guidelines that support river restoration and provide natural security against increased flood and drought brought on by climate change.  We appreciate the Administration’s efforts, and we will be reviewing the new rules closely.”
 
“Healthy rivers, wetlands, and coasts provide clean and abundant supplies of water, protect communities by reducing flood and storm damages, and provide essential habitat for fish and wildlife. Federal agencies must account for these values in water resources planning.”


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About American Rivers

About American Rivers

American Rivers protects wild rivers, restores damaged rivers, and conserves clean water for people and nature. Since 1973, American Rivers has protected and restored more than 150,000 miles of rivers through advocacy efforts, on-the-ground projects, and the annual America’s Most Endangered Rivers® campaign. Headquartered in Washington, DC, American Rivers has offices across the country and more than 200,000 members, supporters, and volunteers.

Rivers connect us to each other, nature, and future generations. Find your connections at AmericanRivers.org, Facebook.com/AmericanRivers, and Twitter.com/AmericanRivers.