American Rivers Opens New Northern Rockies Office in Montana

Scott Bosse to serve as Director of the office

December 2nd, 2009

Scott Bosse, American Rivers, 406-570-0455
Caitlin Jennings, American Rivers, 202-347-7550

(Bozeman, Montana) – American Rivers, the nation’s leading river conservation organization, today announced that it has opened a new Northern Rockies Office in Bozeman, Montana and that Scott Bosse will serve as Director of the office.

Scott Bosse has more than 13 years of experience protecting and restoring rivers.  The focus of American Rivers’ Northern Rockies office will be river protection work primarily in Montana and Wyoming.

“We are delighted to have such a talented professional as Scott joining our team to lead this new office and further out commitment to river protection and restoration in Montana and Wyoming,” said Rebecca Wodder, president of American Rivers. “Rivers are at the heart of what makes the landscapes of these great states come alive, and what provides the habitat and corridors for their abundant fish and wildlife.”
Healthy rivers provide sourcewaters, drinking water, flood protection, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation opportunities, and economic benefits to local communities.  American Rivers will work with local partners, government agencies, and other stake holders to improve river protection policies and practices and raise awareness of river protection efforts.

Since its founding in 1973, American Rivers has led a national effort to protect rivers through Wild and Scenic Designation. A designation creates a protected buffer along both sides of a river, blocks dams and other harmful water projects, and preserves a river’s free-flowing nature. It also helps protect and improve water quality, as well as the river’s unique historic, cultural, scenic, ecological, and recreational values. Designation can also bring economic benefits to the surrounding region as well by supporting recreation and tourism and protecting the quality of life.

“I am thrilled to join American Rivers and contribute to their great track record of success protecting rivers,” said Scott Bosse, Director of  the Northern Rockies office of American Rivers. “I am looking forward to working with communities across the region to find collaborative ways help protect the rivers that are so vital to our health, heritage, and quality of life.”

Prior to joining American Rivers, Scott spent eight years as the Director of Aquatic Conservation for the Greater Yellowstone Coalition (GYC).  While there, he spearheaded a historic campaign that resulted in the addition of 13 rivers and nearly 400 river miles in Wyoming’s Snake River drainage to the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System.  Before going to work for GYC, Scott spent five years as a conservation scientist for Idaho Rivers United, where he led a national campaign to restore wild salmon and steelhead to the interior Northwest. Scott has also worked as a fisheries biologist for the National Park Service in Olympic National Park, Washington; the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in Salmon, Idaho; and The Nature Conservancy in Oregon’s Warner Lakes Basin. 

Scott holds bachelor degrees in geography and political science from the University of Vermont and a M.S. in Environmental Studies from the University of Montana.

 


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About American Rivers

About American Rivers

American Rivers protects wild rivers, restores damaged rivers, and conserves clean water for people and nature. Since 1973, American Rivers has protected and restored more than 150,000 miles of rivers through advocacy efforts, on-the-ground projects, and an annual America’s Most Endangered Rivers® campaign. Headquartered in Washington, DC, American Rivers has offices across the country and more than 200,000 members, supporters, and volunteers.

Rivers connect us to each other, nature, and future generations. Find your connections at AmericanRivers.org, Facebook.com/AmericanRivers, and Twitter.com/AmericanRivers.