American Rivers Applauds Army Corps for Natural Flood Management Proposal

Decision to scrap dam construction at Morris County's Hedden Park good for community and environment

January 29th, 2009

Stephanie Lindloff, American Rivers, 518-482-2631
Caitlin Jennings, American Rivers, 202-347-7550 

Albany, NY American Rivers today praised the Army Corps of Engineers for choosing a 21st century flood management solution in the Jackson Brook watershed. The Corps’ decision not to build a 20-foot dam at Hedden Park, and instead focus on watershed restoration solutions will reduce flood risk and improve community safety.

Stephanie Lindloff, senior director of river restoration for American Rivers, made the following statement:

“The Corps is making the right decision by pursuing watershed restoration over dam construction. This is the kind of 21st century flood management strategy we need on rivers and streams across New Jersey and the country.”

“The best way to protect communities from floods is by working with nature, not against it. Healthy rivers, floodplains and wetlands act like sponges, absorbing floodwaters that may otherwise race downstream, threatening people and property.”

“Engineered solutions like dams are costly today and over the long-term – and can create a false sense of security, encouraging unwise floodplain development that only increases flood damage costs. Dams and levees also destroy a river’s natural ability to absorb floodwaters, and cut off wildlife habitat and recreation access.”

 


###

About American Rivers

About American Rivers

American Rivers protects wild rivers, restores damaged rivers, and conserves clean water for people and nature. Since 1973, American Rivers has protected and restored more than 150,000 miles of rivers through advocacy efforts, on-the-ground projects, and an annual America’s Most Endangered Rivers® campaign. Headquartered in Washington, DC, American Rivers has offices across the country and more than 200,000 members, supporters, and volunteers.

Rivers connect us to each other, nature, and future generations. Find your connections at AmericanRivers.org, Facebook.com/AmericanRivers, and Twitter.com/AmericanRivers.