Major Step Forward For Klamath River Restoration


UnDam Klamath | © Patrick McCully

Removing the four dams on the Klamath River will open up habitat for fish and wildlife | © Patrick McCully

One of the nation’s biggest dam removal and river restoration efforts got a major boost on Friday with Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR) announcing that he will introduce legislation to authorize the Klamath River restoration agreements.

Elected officials, Tribal leaders, and farming, ranching, and conservation representatives gathered Friday to celebrate the signing of the Upper Klamath Basin Comprehensive Agreement (UKBCA). The agreement resolves water rights disputes among the Klamath Tribes and upper basin irrigators, and permanently increases river flows, protects riverside lands, and provides $40 million to the Klamath Tribes for economic development.

Senator Wyden announced that he will introduce legislation that authorizes the UKBCA, as well as the two existing Klamath settlement agreements, the Klamath Hydropower Settlement Agreement and the Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement. Together the three agreements will resolve long-standing water rights disputes, increase water supply reliability for upper basin agricultural communities, improve river flows and water quality, restore wetlands, and allow for the removal of PacifiCorp’s lower four Klamath River dams. The restoration agreements are necessary to restore struggling Klamath salmon runs.

The agreements, the first of which was finalized in 2010, are the product of years of negotiations among more than 40 stakeholder groups including American Rivers, with the goal of restoring the river, reviving ailing salmon and steelhead runs, and revitalizing fishing, tribal, and farming communities.

Removing the four dams will open access to more than 300 miles of habitat for salmon and steelhead. When dam removal begins on the Klamath – scheduled for 2020 – it will be one of the nation’s largest dam removal projects. Before the settlement agreements can be fully implemented, Congress must pass Senator Wyden’s legislation and appropriate funds, and California must contribute an estimated $80 million to augment the $200 million being collected from PacifiCorp ratepayers for dam removal and river restoration. No federal funds will be used for dam removal.

PacifiCorp’s four dams, built between 1908 and 1962, cut off hundreds of miles of once-productive salmon spawning and rearing habitat in the Upper Klamath, which was once the third most productive salmon river on the West Coast. The dams also create toxic conditions in the reservoirs that threaten the health of fish and people.

The dams produce a nominal amount of power, which can be replaced using renewables and efficiency measures, without contributing to climate change. A study by the California Energy Commission and the Department of the Interior found that removing the dams and replacing their power would save PacifiCorp customers up to $285 million over 30 years.

Roughly 1,150 dams have been removed nationwide and 51 dams were removed in 2013.

3 Responses to “Major Step Forward For Klamath River Restoration”

Madelaine Pierrce

This is terrific news. When visiting California, I stopped at the Klamath. The emerald water is indescribably beautiful, I could list it as one of the most scenic rivers in the U.S. With a rich history for native tribes, this is a success for river conservationists nationwide. Great work as always AR!

E. Dawson

I used to live on the Klamath. It is a truly beautiful place. It also was suffering greatly for water. Taking these dams out is a very good plan.