Mt. Hood Rivers, Oregon

Oregon enjoys a reputation for some of the greatest river ecosystems and river recreation in the country.  Many of these rivers are currently protected under the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act—the Rogue, Umpqua, Deschutes, Sandy and Clackamas Rivers.    The “outstandingly remarkable” rivers of Mount   Hood provide clean drinking water and offer fantastic river recreation… Read more »

North Fork John Day River, Oregon

As the second longest undammed river in the continental United States, the John Day River in northeastern Oregon provides some of the best remaining habitat for salmon and steelhead in the country. The North Fork John Day Sub-basin and its cold-water tributaries alone support the largest runs of steelhead in the entire Columbia River system…. Read more »

Wild Rogue River, Oregon

The Rogue River is one of the most iconic rivers in the United States, providing freshwater habitat to enormous ocean-going salmon runs and possessing flora and fauna diversity unmatched anywhere in the Pacific Northwest. The Rogue’s outstanding values are nationally recognized, and the river was one of the original eight rivers designated under the Wild… Read more »

Natural Defenses: Safeguarding Communities from Floods

Increasing Flood Risk in a Changing Climate The impacts of our changing climate are becoming more apparent every day. In the first decade of the new millennium, extreme rainfall events, combined with changes in land use, have resulted in an increase in flood events and in an increase in annual flood losses from $6 billion… Read more »

America’s Most Endangered Rivers Report: 2008 Edition

(April 2008) Fifteen years ago, in November 1992, 1,700 of the world’s leading scientists, including the  majority of Nobel laureates in the sciences, issued an ominous warning to the world: “No more than one or a fewdecades remain before the chance to avert the threats we now confront will be lost and the prospects for… Read more »

Beyond Dams: Options and Alternatives

Read the full report (PDF) Introduction Rivers weave in and out of our lives, providing innumerable benefits to communities across the world. In the United States, we rely on our rivers for drinking water, irrigation, aquatic habitat, fisheries, energy, navigation, recreation and simply the natural beauty they bring to our landscapes. Humans have been building… Read more »

Dam Removal Success Stories

Read the full report (PDF) Introduction  Few human actions have more significant impacts on a river system than the presence of a dam. As a result, dams occupy a central role in the debate about protecting and restoring our river resources. Many of the major environmental campaigns in the United States, and around the world,… Read more »

What’s In Your Water: The State of Public Notification in 11 U.S. States

Executive Summary Our clean water is threatened by aging, overburdened sewer systems that overflow more than 860 billion gallons of raw and partially-treated sewage into our rivers and streams every year. Sewage spills threaten public health, spoil recreation, hinder economic values, and harm wildlife. As pipes age and the population grows, America’s overburdened wastewater infrastructure… Read more »

President Obama Signs Historic Wild and Scenic River Bill into Law

Washington, DC – American Rivers applauded President Barack Obama today for signing into the law the second largest Wild and Scenic Rivers package in history. The Omnibus Public Land Management Act of 2009 designates 86 new Wild and Scenic Rivers, totaling over 1,100 miles in Oregon, Idaho, Arizona, Wyoming, Utah, California, and Massachusetts. The legislation… Read more »