7000 Reasons to Remove a Small, Outdated Dam

The Lassiter Mill Dam removal would never have happened without the collaboration between all our project partners | © United States Fish & Wildlife Service This week we took another step in restoring the rivers of North Carolina by removing the Lassiter Mill Dam on the Uwharrie River. This project, which American Rivers has actively supported… Read more »

Water Efficiency Guidelines for Water Supply Projects in the Southeast

Providing a clean and reliable water supply is of growing concern for many Southeastern communities, as well as communities across the United States. Among the available solutions, reservoirs, created by damming rivers to capture and store water, are often the first choice of water utilities. Water supply reservoirs are viewed as a quick fix, but… Read more »

The Permitting Process for Water Supply Reservoirs

The construction of water supply reservoir projects requires a Clean Water Act Section 404 permit for “the discharge of the dredged or fill material in waters of the U.S.” resulting from building the dam and control structures. EPA and the Corps of Engineers’ responsibility in the Section 404 permit process is to ensure that any… Read more »

Water Efficiency in North Carolina

North Carolina is at a crossroads. The combination of population growth and climate change will put increased stress on available water. Communities are scrambling to identify water supply solutions and, as documented in the Hidden Reservoir’s report, water efficiency is the quickest, cheapest way to assure reliable long term water supply.  Water Efficiency Policy The… Read more »

Cheoah River Flows Again

Cheoah River by Abby Rose Cantrell When the Tallassee Power Company (or TAPOCO) closed the gates on the Santeetlah Dam in 1928, North Carolina’s Cheoah River vanished. For nearly 75 years, the riverbed was almost completely dry. At the Santeetlah dam, the Cheoah’s entire flow disappeared into a steel pipe that cut though a mountain… Read more »

Response to Duke Energy’s Statement on the Catawba River Coal Ash Ponds

It is our understanding that Duke Energy issued a preemptive statement on April 16, 2013 in anticipation of American Rivers’ designation of the Catawba River as one of America’s Most Endangered Rivers®.  Rick Gaskins, Executive Director and Catawba Riverkeeper, provides a section-by-section response to Duke’s statement below in italics.  Duke Energy Statement: It’s disappointing that… Read more »

Cleanup the Coal Ash!

Today’s guest blog about the #5 Catawba River- a part of our America’s Most Endangered Rivers® series- is from Sara Behnke, a local resident living near the Riverbend Steam Station. Take Action to Protect theCatawba River Tell Duke Energy to clean up their toxic coal ash! Thirteen years ago, when my husband and I built… Read more »

Catawba River

America’s Most Endangered Rivers for 2013: Catawba River North Carolina, South Carolina At Risk: Coal ash pollution Threat: Drinking water and recreational enjoyment Catawba River, NC| Jeff Cravotta Urge Duke Energy to remove the coal ash ponds and all the contaminants they contain and dispose of it in a lined facility. Millions of people in… Read more »

Catawba River Among America’s Most Endangered Rivers

Washington, D.C.- American Rivers named the Carolinas’ Catawba River among America’s Most Endangered Rivers® of 2013 today, shining a national spotlight on the riverside coal ash ponds currently leaking pollution and threatening water quality, human health, and local fish populations. American Rivers and its partners are calling on the North Carolina Department of Environment and… Read more »

Clean Water Supplies Through Green Infrastructure

Most Americans get their drinking water from rivers and streams | Katherine Baer Here, where I live in North Carolina, our drinking water comes from streams and rivers, like Cane Creek, and Bolin Creek, right near our house flows into Lake Jordan, a regional water supply. And this is true for many of us –… Read more »