Saving the Grand Canyon

One of our country’s most iconic stretches of river and foremost natural treasures – the Colorado River’s Grand Canyon – is facing a battery of threats that could forever harm the river’s health and ruin the once-in-a-lifetime experience for people visiting the park. American Rivers is spearheading a national effort to save this special place, and we need your help.

Protecting the Wild Yampa River

The Yampa River in northwest Colorado is the last major free-flowing river in the Colorado River Basin. Carving through beautiful canyons and rich with history, the Yampa joins the Green River in Dinosaur National Monument. Because of its wild nature, the Yampa and its canyons provide refuge for endangered species and offer unparalleled recreational opportunities.

Colorado River Basin Study Overview

In December 2012, the Bureau of Reclamation released the Colorado River Basin Study, a comprehensive look at projected water shortages and outdated water management in a basin that the American west has drawn heavily on for decades.

Colorado River Basin – Protecting the Flows

Until 1998, the Colorado River stretched all the way from its source in the Rockies to Sea of Cortez. Now, it dries up in the Sonoran Desert miles before it reaches the sea. The Colorado River is the lifeline of the west, fueling economies in seven states where people use the river's water for their material sustenance; millions more use the river itself for recreation.

Verde River

The Verde River is an important tributary to the Colorado River and a unique resource in Arizona. One of the few perennially flowing rivers in the Southwest, the Verde sustains lush riverside forest, a large and diverse wildlife population, and provides critical drinking water to many Central Arizona communities. Aboriginal cultures have been present in the area for thousands of years. Cliff dwellings can still be seen in the rocks above the river.

Connecting Water Conservation Efforts and Instream Flow Protections in the Colorado River Basin

American Rivers is partnering with the Alliance for Water Efficiency and the Environmental Law Institute on a one-year project exploring the links between water efficiency and instream flows in the Colorado River basin.