2014 California Water Bond [Proposition 1]

California Proposition 1, the Water Bond (Assembly Bill 1471) is a $7.12 billion package that, upon voter approval in November, will support a host of river restoration, water conservation and recycling, groundwater cleanup and water supply projects.

Oregon and California (“O&C”) Lands

The future of 2.6 million acres of high value public forest lands is at risk. Managed mainly by the Bureau of Land Management in Oregon known as Oregon and California (“O&C”) lands, these forests are home to perhaps the highest concentrations of pristine wild rivers in the United States. Watersheds such as the Rogue, Illinois, Umpqua, and McKenzie support abundant fish and wildlife, including elk, black-tail deer, back bear and the healthiest wild salmon and steelhead runs south of Canada.

Protecting California’s Flowing Rivers

California FERC Hydropower Dam Relicensing

Water Efficiency Guidelines for Water Supply Projects in the Southeast

Given that water efficiency is often the least damaging, cost-effective water supply option, US EPA Region 4, developed guidelines to assist communities seeking new water supplies to better understand the water efficiency options that they need to consider prior to applying for a permit to construct a water supply reservoir.

Protecting Flow with the Clean Water Act

Explicit standards recognizing water flow as essential to supporting existing and classified designated uses are crucial to meeting the goals of the Clean Water Act. While water flows are implicitly protected, in practice some State agencies charged with implementing the Clean Water Act focus on the chemical component of the water quality and provide only cursory review of how their decisions will affect physical and biological integrity.

Broad River, SC: Restoring Flows, Fish and Flowers

American Rivers work in Columbia, SC to improve flows in the Broad River.

The Permitting Process for Water Supply Reservoirs

The construction of water supply reservoir projects requires a Clean Water Act Section 404 permit for "the discharge of the dredged or fill material in waters of the U.S.‰" resulting from building the dam and control structures.

The Clean Water Act: Flow Standards

The water quality components of the Clean Water Act are aimed at protecting the full scope of benefits that clean and abundant water provide to society at large. The parameters for success of this goal are water quality standards that protect existing and classified designated uses.

Water Efficiency in North Carolina

American Rivers is working in North Carolina to implement the recommended policies in the Hidden Reservoir report to improve water efficiency.

Cheoah River Flows Again

Restoring natural flow patterns to this stretch of the Cheoah river, has already improved its diverse native aquatic life, helping species like the endangered Appalachian Elktoe mussel to make a comeback. The new flows also allow for improved fishing and world-class whitewater boating.

Upper Flint River Working Group

A key element of our project in the upper Flint is to help convene an Upper Flint River Working Group‰ÛÓa group of diverse stakeholders coming together with the common goal of restoring healthy flows in the upper Flint. Although the Flint has suffered in recent years from declining low flows, collaborative work on finding solutions can restore the river to health.

2012 Dams Removed

Communities in 19 states, working in partnership with non-profit organizations and state and federal agencies, removed 65 dams in 2012, American Rivers announced today. Outdated or unsafe dams came out of rivers across the nation, restoring 400 miles of streams for the benefit of fish, wildlife and people across the country.

River Restoration In Oakley, CA Engages Community

River restoration can be a win-win situation, inviting nature back in to become the centerpiece of a thriving community. In the city of Oakley, river ecology has sparked a community‰'s interest and engagement.

Marsh Creek Fish Passage Restoration

The fish ladder on Marsh Creek, upstream from Dutch Slough in the Bay Delta, enables salmon to bypass a 6-foot high dam and access 7 miles of salmon habitat upstream.

Horse Creek Dam, Horse Creek, CA

With our funding support and planning assistance, the Horse Creek dam in the Sisquoc River basin near Santa Barbara was blown up to make way for steelhead.

Mattole River, CA

We have helped fund a local watershed group to remove numerous poorly designed road crossings that prevented coho salmon and steelhead from reaching large portions of the Mattole River watershed.

Meadow Restoration Publications

Mountain Meadow Restoration

Meadows are critical to the larger watershed because of their unique hydrologic and ecological functions. They store spring floodwaters and release cool flows in late summer; they filter out sediment and pollutants, produce high-quality forage and provide habitat for rare and threatened species. American Rivers is currently working on the critical needs of our Sierra Meadows through several different projects.

Local Stormwater Codes and Ordinances

American Rivers is working at the local level to review current codes and ordinances to provide sound recommendations to Planning Commissions and legislative bodies to reduce hard surfaces, create incentives to implement low impact development techniques such as rain gardens, bioretention, and green roofs, and protect buffers. These local changes will reduce polluted stormwater runoff and flooding and increase greenspace.

2010 Dam Removals

Our list of 60 dams that were removed in 2010, benefitting hundreds of miles of rivers nationwide.

Expanding Meadow Restoration Across the Sierra Nevada

We are developing and standardizing methods to assess, prioritize and restore Sierra meadows and guidelines for monitoring post-restoration outcomes.

Barrier Removals in California

In California, at least 80% of the historic spawning and rearing habitat historically available to salmon and steelhead has been blocked by barriers. Our California program focuses on removing obsolete dams and other barriers to provide fish migration and restore more natural river conditions

Eel River, CA

American Rivers is providing funding to California State Parks through our National Partnership with the NOAA Community-based Restoration Program to look at the possibility of dam removal and river restoration to open up over 60 miles of Eel River to salmon. Dam removal would mean there would be no more barriers to salmon on the South Fork of the Eel River. The dam is also a liability and cost to California State Parks and California taxpayers so there would also be financial benefits to removal.

Klamath River, OR and CA

The Klamath River once supported the third-largest salmon run on the West Coast. Today, salmon and steelhead runs are a fraction of their historic abundance, with some near extinction.

Yuba River, CA

Some of California's oldest dams are located on the Yuba river, blocking salmon and steelhead from their historic habitat in the upper Yuba basin.

Restoring Savannah River Shoals: Two States, a Canal and a Redhorse

American Rivers is working to improve the health of the Savannah River‰'s Augusta Shoals. We successfully negotiated a new agreement with the City of Augusta, Georgia and the South Carolina Coastal Conservation League (SCCCL) to improve natural water flows from upstream dams.

Protecting the Little River, NC: Sustainable Water Supply vs. New Reservoir

Wake County and the City of Raleigh have proposed a new reservoir on the Little River.

Restoring the Health of Georgia’s Flint River

Georgia's Flint River is one of only 40 rivers left in the United States that flow for more than 200 miles undammed, and American Rivers intends to keep the Flint that way. Rising from humble origins just south of Atlanta - the river's headwater streams actually flow out of pipes buried beneath the world's busiest airport, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International - the Flint quickly becomes a water supply source for communities in the southern part of the Atlanta metropolitan area and downstream throughout west-central Georgia.

Hope Valley Restoration Project: A Collaborative Effort

The West Fork of the Carson River meanders down the Sierra through Hope Valley, a highly visible meadow American Rivers is working to restore with our project partners.

Flows in the Southeast

American Rivers is working in targeted states on water supply legislation that will protect the drinking water supply of our communities and the rivers that provide recreational, economic, and quality of life benefits in the face of climate change and population growth.

We are focusing our current efforts in North and South Carolina.

Central Valley Flood Management

Flood risk is growing in the Central Valley because the current flood conveyance system is insufficient to contain existing or future floods. American Rivers is working to reduce risk, restore ecosystems through flood conveyance and appropriate land usage.

Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta

American Rivers is working to protect and restore the Delta for fish, birds, and people, and to provide sufficient water supply for the people of California through habitat restoration, flood management improvements, among other changes in operation.

Flood Bypasses in California

As exemplified by the Yolo Bypass in California American Rivers is promoting the multiple benefits provided by flood bypasses for risk reduction and habitat restoration.

Lower San Joaquin River Flood Bypass

A bypass in the Lower San Joaquin would provide the only opportunity for expanding conveyance capacity, to protect cities, enhance habitat, and prepare for climate change.

Bay-Delta Conservation Plan

American Rivers is working to integrate sustainable flood management strategies into the Bay-Delta Conservation Plan to protect Californians, restore native habitat, and enhance the reliability of upstream reservoirs.

Dutch Slough Tidal Marsh Restoration Project

American Rivers is participating in the first major tidal wetlands restoration on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, restoring over six miles of shoreline and providing recreational opportunities.

Yolo Bypass and the Fremont Weir

The Yolo Bypass flood easement allows California to flood land in for public safety and ecological benefit. To expedite the habitat restoration and native species revival on the bypass American River is advocating for a controlled notch system on the Fremont Weir.

Feather River, CA

Through the relicensing of the Oroville Dam, American Rivers is helping to restore water flows and temperature, floodplain habitat, habitat for salmon and steelhead, and improve recreational opportunities along the Feather River.

Stormwater Management in the Yuba Watershed

American Rivers installed green infrastructure (raingarden, bioswale, and pervious concrete) to help eliminate runoff pollution before it reaches the Yuba River, spawning grounds for spring run Chinook salmon.

Grazing Benefits on Restored Meadows

We are exploring how meadow restoration directly impacts private landowners, particularly ranchers, and where meadow restoration on private land can yield multiple economic and conservation benefits.

Pauley Creek Meadows Restoration

The Pauley Creek Meadows projects is restoring 440 acres of Sierra meadows, linking three large meadows together and introducing citizen science monitors to this beautiful landscape.

Bear Valley Meadow Restoration Project

Restoring cultural and ecological integrity to Bear Valley Meadow while integrating climate change predictions into the restoration design

Deer Creek Tribute Trail

Successful Habitat Restoration Projects

Connecting Water Conservation Efforts and Instream Flow Protections in the Colorado River Basin

American Rivers is partnering with the Alliance for Water Efficiency and the Environmental Law Institute on a one-year project exploring the links between water efficiency and instream flows in the Colorado River basin.

Water Efficiency in the Southeast

Water Efficiency in the Southeast Local governments are uniquely positioned to manage municipal water use. American Rivers has been working with communities across the Southeast to adopt policies that increase water efficiency and decrease water waste.

Sierra Water Trust

The Sierra Water Trust project seeks to improve water quality and increase aquatic function and biodiversity in the Sierra Nevada Region through building capacity to use water rights acquisition as a tool for stream restoration, to examine watershed problems in a broader context and to use science to monitor and manage water availability and use in Sierra streams.

River Friendly Agriculture in the San Gregorio Watershed

Creating a win-win situation for rivers and agriculture in California's San Gregorio watershed.

Congaree River Blue Trail

American Rivers helps to protect the Congaree River Blue Trail in South Carolina to assure enhanced stream flows to support river recreation and a health and clean water supply

Hitchcock Creek Blue Trail

With the help of American Rivers, Hitchcock Creek in Rockingham, North Carolina is becoming a more valuable community asset, and will serve as an attraction for fishing, boating, and other recreation. Until recently, a dam degraded the Hitchcock Creek, blocked migrating fish from spawning and prevented the community from safely enjoying their river through boating and fishing.

Waccamaw River Blue Trail

The Waccamaw River Blue Trail will not only improve recreational opportunities, it will also help to educate citizens, local governments, and elected officials about the importance of the river as a community asset, increase community involvement in the river, and support conservation. This project will also serve as a model for how to work with city and county councils to encourage land protection and riparian buffers through educational and incentive programs. the river as a community asset, increase community involvement in the river, and support conservation.

Wateree River Blue Trail

American Rivers has helped to create the Wateree Blue trail, which offers opportunities for river recreation as well as helps to protect the Wateree River.