The Ecological and Recreational Benefit of the Molalla River, Oregon

Read the full report (PDF) Executive Summary The Molalla River is an Oregon natural treasure. This 53-mile river originates in coniferous forests in the foothills of the Cascade Mountains and travels downstream through forests and agricultural land before joining the Willamette River. The Molalla is a valuable and necessary feature for local communities in the… Read more »

Biological Contributions of Tributary Streams to the Wild Rogue River

Read the full report (PDF) Executive Summary Tributary streams in the Wild Rogue basin provide critical biological benefits and services to aquatic species and riparian habitats. These streams supply fish habitat for anadromous fish (such as coho salmon and steelhead) which are estimated to be present in approximately 100 stream miles across fourteen tributary streams (BLM,… Read more »

Beyond Banning Dams: Wild and Scenic Designations

Read the full report (PDF) INTRODUCTION The movement to protect the nation’s remaining free-flowing rivers was born out of America’s “big dam” era from the 1930s to the 1960s. Concerned at the rapid pace of development of many of the country’s rivers for power, flood control, and irrigation, people across the United States acted to ensure… Read more »

Ecological Riverfront Design: Restoring Rivers, Connecting Communities

A report by Betsy Otto, Kathleen McCormick, and Michael Leccese American Planning Association (APA) holds the copyright for this report. Please do not copy or post the files provided here without permission from APA. To purchase the full report from the American Planning Association bookstore, click here.  (Note: All links below are in PDF format)… Read more »

America’s Most Endangered Rivers Report: 2007 Edition

Read the Full Report(PDF) Rivers come in all shapes and sizes, and vary from pristine to heavily polluted, but it’s generally safe to assume that water is a common denominator among them. For the Santa Fe, 2007’s Most Endangered River, water is the missing ingredient, leaving this once-thriving river a dry, weed-choked ditch most of… Read more »

America’s Most Endangered Rivers Report: 2008 Edition

(April 2008) Fifteen years ago, in November 1992, 1,700 of the world’s leading scientists, including the  majority of Nobel laureates in the sciences, issued an ominous warning to the world: “No more than one or a fewdecades remain before the chance to avert the threats we now confront will be lost and the prospects for… Read more »

Beyond Dams: Options and Alternatives

Read the full report (PDF) Introduction Rivers weave in and out of our lives, providing innumerable benefits to communities across the world. In the United States, we rely on our rivers for drinking water, irrigation, aquatic habitat, fisheries, energy, navigation, recreation and simply the natural beauty they bring to our landscapes. Humans have been building… Read more »

Natural Defenses: Safeguarding Communities from Floods

Increasing Flood Risk in a Changing Climate The impacts of our changing climate are becoming more apparent every day. In the first decade of the new millennium, extreme rainfall events, combined with changes in land use, have resulted in an increase in flood events and in an increase in annual flood losses from $6 billion… Read more »

What’s In Your Water: The State of Public Notification in 11 U.S. States

Executive Summary Our clean water is threatened by aging, overburdened sewer systems that overflow more than 860 billion gallons of raw and partially-treated sewage into our rivers and streams every year. Sewage spills threaten public health, spoil recreation, hinder economic values, and harm wildlife. As pipes age and the population grows, America’s overburdened wastewater infrastructure… Read more »