2014 California Water Bond [Proposition 1]

California Proposition 1, the Water Bond (Assembly Bill 1471) is a $7.12 billion package that, upon voter approval in November, will support a host of river restoration, water conservation and recycling, groundwater cleanup and water supply projects.

River Rebirth: Removing Edwards Dam on Maine’s Kennebec River

On July 1, 1999, as a church bell broke the stillness of the morning, I had the great privilege of witnessing the rebirth of Maine’s Kennebec River as it flowed free for the first time in 162 years. Since then, I have had the opportunity to observe numerous other dam removals, but none quite as moving, successful, and ultimately transformative.

Oregon and California (“O&C”) Lands

The future of 2.6 million acres of high value public forest lands is at risk. Managed mainly by the Bureau of Land Management in Oregon known as Oregon and California (“O&C”) lands, these forests are home to perhaps the highest concentrations of pristine wild rivers in the United States. Watersheds such as the Rogue, Illinois, Umpqua, and McKenzie support abundant fish and wildlife, including elk, black-tail deer, back bear and the healthiest wild salmon and steelhead runs south of Canada.

Stearns Dam Removal, Crooked River, Oregon

In October 2013, Stearns Dam joined a list of other note-worthy Pacific Northwest dams: Elwha, Condit, Marmot and Savage Rapids when it was removed from the Crooked River.

Nooksack River Recreation Planning

The purpose of the Nooksack River Recreation Plan (NRRP) is to provide guidance and clear recommendations for managing recreation use in the upper watersheds while at the same time protecting and restoring streamside and riverine habitat for fish and wildlife.

Protecting California’s Flowing Rivers

California FERC Hydropower Dam Relicensing

Our Next Wild and Scenic Rivers

American Rivers and partners are working to protect new rivers with Wild and Scenic designation, including rivers in the North Cascades, Olympic Peninsula, and the Rogue. They are outstanding rivers with special fish and wildlife habitat, clean water, and recreation opportunities for future generations.

Protecting the Wild Yampa River

The Yampa River in northwest Colorado is the last major free-flowing river in the Colorado River Basin. Carving through beautiful canyons and rich with history, the Yampa joins the Green River in Dinosaur National Monument. Because of its wild nature, the Yampa and its canyons provide refuge for endangered species and offer unparalleled recreational opportunities.

Colorado River Basin Study Overview

In December 2012, the Bureau of Reclamation released the Colorado River Basin Study, a comprehensive look at projected water shortages and outdated water management in a basin that the American west has drawn heavily on for decades.

2012 Dams Removed

Communities in 19 states, working in partnership with non-profit organizations and state and federal agencies, removed 65 dams in 2012, American Rivers announced today. Outdated or unsafe dams came out of rivers across the nation, restoring 400 miles of streams for the benefit of fish, wildlife and people across the country.

River Restoration In Oakley, CA Engages Community

River restoration can be a win-win situation, inviting nature back in to become the centerpiece of a thriving community. In the city of Oakley, river ecology has sparked a community‰'s interest and engagement.

Colorado River Basin – Protecting the Flows

Until 1998, the Colorado River stretched all the way from its source in the Rockies to Sea of Cortez. Now, it dries up in the Sonoran Desert miles before it reaches the sea. The Colorado River is the lifeline of the west, fueling economies in seven states where people use the river's water for their material sustenance; millions more use the river itself for recreation.

Marsh Creek Fish Passage Restoration

The fish ladder on Marsh Creek, upstream from Dutch Slough in the Bay Delta, enables salmon to bypass a 6-foot high dam and access 7 miles of salmon habitat upstream.

The 10th Anniversary of the Removal of Maine’s Edwards Dam

Ten years ago, on July 1, 1999, American Rivers and our partners celebrated a historic success when Edwards Dam was removed from the Kennebec River in Augusta, Maine. The dam removal marked a turning point for river conservation in our country. Since then, more than 600 outdated dams have been removed nationwide, and the number of recorded dam removals has grown each year.

Horse Creek Dam, Horse Creek, CA

With our funding support and planning assistance, the Horse Creek dam in the Sisquoc River basin near Santa Barbara was blown up to make way for steelhead.

Mattole River, CA

We have helped fund a local watershed group to remove numerous poorly designed road crossings that prevented coho salmon and steelhead from reaching large portions of the Mattole River watershed.

Yakima Basin Conservation Campaign

American Rivers is working with the Yakama Indian Nation and conservation partners at the National Wildlife Federation, The Wilderness Society, Trout Unlimited, and others to negotiate a comprehensive package of large scale fish passage, habitat restoration and protection, and water management improvements to restore abundant Yakima River salmon and steelhead in a way that earns the lasting support of the Yakama Nation, local farmers, and local communities.

Verde River

The Verde River is an important tributary to the Colorado River and a unique resource in Arizona. One of the few perennially flowing rivers in the Southwest, the Verde sustains lush riverside forest, a large and diverse wildlife population, and provides critical drinking water to many Central Arizona communities. Aboriginal cultures have been present in the area for thousands of years. Cliff dwellings can still be seen in the rocks above the river.

Meadow Restoration Publications

Mountain Meadow Restoration

Meadows are critical to the larger watershed because of their unique hydrologic and ecological functions. They store spring floodwaters and release cool flows in late summer; they filter out sediment and pollutants, produce high-quality forage and provide habitat for rare and threatened species. American Rivers is currently working on the critical needs of our Sierra Meadows through several different projects.

2010 Dam Removals

Our list of 60 dams that were removed in 2010, benefitting hundreds of miles of rivers nationwide.

Expanding Meadow Restoration Across the Sierra Nevada

We are developing and standardizing methods to assess, prioritize and restore Sierra meadows and guidelines for monitoring post-restoration outcomes.

Barrier Removals in California

In California, at least 80% of the historic spawning and rearing habitat historically available to salmon and steelhead has been blocked by barriers. Our California program focuses on removing obsolete dams and other barriers to provide fish migration and restore more natural river conditions

Condit Dam, White Salmon River, WA

Removal of the dam began with a breach draining the reservoir on October 26, 2011, and will allow the White Salmon River to once again be home to abundant wild salmon and steelhead runs

Eel River, CA

American Rivers is providing funding to California State Parks through our National Partnership with the NOAA Community-based Restoration Program to look at the possibility of dam removal and river restoration to open up over 60 miles of Eel River to salmon. Dam removal would mean there would be no more barriers to salmon on the South Fork of the Eel River. The dam is also a liability and cost to California State Parks and California taxpayers so there would also be financial benefits to removal.

Elwha River Restoration, WA

The removal of two dams on Washington's Elwha River is one of the most significant river restoration projects of our time.

Green River, MA

American Rivers' work on the Green River will remove the first dam on the river, the Wiley & Russell Dam. The dam is a timber crib and concrete dam that is 14-feet high and 165 feet long. The Town is also considering fish passage at the second dam, the Mill Street Dam, and partners will investigate additional options for the two upstream dams once passage is achieved at the lower dams.

Kellogg Creek Dam, OR

Kellogg Dam is located at the mouth of Kellogg Creek which is a tributary to the Willamette River in the City of Milwaukie, Oregon. The creek historically had populations of Coho salmon before the dam was constructed, but now this 16 foot high dam blocks passage for Coho and other salmonids. The City of Milwaukie plans to remove the dam as part of an effort to restore these historic Coho runs and to revitalize the Milwaukie riverfront for the local community. The removal will also include the restoration of the stream and lakebed upstream of the dam to create excellent habitat along cold water pools in this area.

Klamath River, OR and CA

The Klamath River once supported the third-largest salmon run on the West Coast. Today, salmon and steelhead runs are a fraction of their historic abundance, with some near extinction.

Lower Snake River, ID, OR and WA

The salmon and steelhead of the Snake River are magnificent creatures, traveling over 900 miles from the sea to spawn in Idaho‰'s high mountain streams. Unfortunately, this icon of the region is threatened with extinction, due in large part to the effects of the four lower Snake River dams.

Penobscot River, ME

The Penobscot River Restoration Trust, of which American Rivers is a founding member, has been working toward removing Penobscot‰'s outdated dams for many years. Removing the river‰'s two lowermost dams (Veazie Dam and Great Works Dam) and installing fish passage on two other dams will restore access to roughly 1,000 miles of habitat for the river‰'s fish, making this project one of the most significant dam removal efforts ever.

Shawsheen River, MA

American Rivers is working with the Center for Ecosystem Restoration, the Massachusetts Division of Ecological Restoration, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and others to remove dams as part of the Shawsheen River Restoration Project in order to restore a free-flowing native river ecosystem.

Yuba River, CA

Some of California's oldest dams are located on the Yuba river, blocking salmon and steelhead from their historic habitat in the upper Yuba basin.

Hope Valley Restoration Project: A Collaborative Effort

The West Fork of the Carson River meanders down the Sierra through Hope Valley, a highly visible meadow American Rivers is working to restore with our project partners.

Central Valley Flood Management

Flood risk is growing in the Central Valley because the current flood conveyance system is insufficient to contain existing or future floods. American Rivers is working to reduce risk, restore ecosystems through flood conveyance and appropriate land usage.

Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta

American Rivers is working to protect and restore the Delta for fish, birds, and people, and to provide sufficient water supply for the people of California through habitat restoration, flood management improvements, among other changes in operation.

Flood Bypasses in California

As exemplified by the Yolo Bypass in California American Rivers is promoting the multiple benefits provided by flood bypasses for risk reduction and habitat restoration.

Lower San Joaquin River Flood Bypass

A bypass in the Lower San Joaquin would provide the only opportunity for expanding conveyance capacity, to protect cities, enhance habitat, and prepare for climate change.

Bay-Delta Conservation Plan

American Rivers is working to integrate sustainable flood management strategies into the Bay-Delta Conservation Plan to protect Californians, restore native habitat, and enhance the reliability of upstream reservoirs.

Dutch Slough Tidal Marsh Restoration Project

American Rivers is participating in the first major tidal wetlands restoration on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, restoring over six miles of shoreline and providing recreational opportunities.

Yolo Bypass and the Fremont Weir

The Yolo Bypass flood easement allows California to flood land in for public safety and ecological benefit. To expedite the habitat restoration and native species revival on the bypass American River is advocating for a controlled notch system on the Fremont Weir.

Feather River, CA

Through the relicensing of the Oroville Dam, American Rivers is helping to restore water flows and temperature, floodplain habitat, habitat for salmon and steelhead, and improve recreational opportunities along the Feather River.

Stormwater Management in the Yuba Watershed

American Rivers installed green infrastructure (raingarden, bioswale, and pervious concrete) to help eliminate runoff pollution before it reaches the Yuba River, spawning grounds for spring run Chinook salmon.

Grazing Benefits on Restored Meadows

We are exploring how meadow restoration directly impacts private landowners, particularly ranchers, and where meadow restoration on private land can yield multiple economic and conservation benefits.

Pauley Creek Meadows Restoration

The Pauley Creek Meadows projects is restoring 440 acres of Sierra meadows, linking three large meadows together and introducing citizen science monitors to this beautiful landscape.

Bear Valley Meadow Restoration Project

Restoring cultural and ecological integrity to Bear Valley Meadow while integrating climate change predictions into the restoration design

American Rivers Wild and Scenic Rivers Work in Montana

American Rivers‰' Montana Wild Rivers Campaign aims to protect the state‰'s great, pristine rivers while they are still pristine, safeguarding against climate change and harmful development.

Illabot Creek, Washington

American Rivers is working to permanently protect Illabot Creek‰'s free-flowing character, water quality and outstanding fish and wildlife values. Illabot Creek, a tributary to the Wild and Scenic Skagit River, provides crucial habitat for two of the Northwest‰'s beloved icons - salmon and eagles.

Alpine Lakes, Washington

American Rivers is working with a coalition of conservation and recreation groups to protect and designate nearly 30 miles of the Middle Fork Snoqualmie and the entire 11-mile Pratt River as Wild and Scenic Rivers, as well as add 22,000 acres of new wilderness to the Alpine Lakes Wilderness area.

Washington Rivers Eligible for Wild and Scenic Designation

Deer Creek Tribute Trail

Moving Out of Harm’s Way

Successful Habitat Restoration Projects

Connecting Water Conservation Efforts and Instream Flow Protections in the Colorado River Basin

American Rivers is partnering with the Alliance for Water Efficiency and the Environmental Law Institute on a one-year project exploring the links between water efficiency and instream flows in the Colorado River basin.

Innovative Water Management in the Northwest

The Northwest‰'s magnificent rivers are the lifeblood of natural ecosystems and human communities. We cannot take our rivers and fresh water for granted. Climate change, population growth, and the increasing value of water as a marketable commodity have led to calls for new water supply reservoirs and more water withdrawals from rivers, both of which can devastate river ecosystems.

Molalla River, Oregon

American Rivers is working to protect the Molalla Rivers, which is an important resource for clean water, and additionally is an important habitat for salmon, trout and steelhead, along with other species that are part of this river ecosystem. Additionally the river is an important place for river recreation.

Mt. Hood Rivers, Oregon

American Rivers' has been active in protecting the rivers of Mt. Hood-- Oregon enjoys a reputation for some of the greatest river ecosystems and river recreation in the country.

Nooksack River, Washington

Flowing from the high snowfields and glaciers of Mt. Baker, Mt. Shuksan, and the Twin Sisters range in the North Cascades, the Nooksack River system is home to all five types of salmon, steelhead, bull trout, bald eagle, black bear, cougar, elk, and many other fish and wildlife species that need intact, wild places to survive. Whitewater rivers, incredible mountain views and old-growth forests provide world-class hiking, kayaking, and other recreation opportunities. Yet the majority of the Nooksack system remains unprotected

North Fork John Day River, Oregon

Olympic Peninsula, Washington

American Rivers is a core member of a coalition working to protect over 400 miles of river habitat on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State through Wild and Scenic designation.

Volcano Country, Washington

American Rivers is working with the Volcano Country Wild and Scenic Rivers Coalition to protect 200 miles of rivers and streams in Southwest Washington‰'s Volcano Country‰ under the federal Wild and Scenic Rivers Act.

Wild Rogue River, Oregon

Sierra Water Trust

The Sierra Water Trust project seeks to improve water quality and increase aquatic function and biodiversity in the Sierra Nevada Region through building capacity to use water rights acquisition as a tool for stream restoration, to examine watershed problems in a broader context and to use science to monitor and manage water availability and use in Sierra streams.

River Friendly Agriculture in the San Gregorio Watershed

Creating a win-win situation for rivers and agriculture in California's San Gregorio watershed.