Congress passes wild & scenic legislation

In a rare stroke of bi-partisanship the U.S. Senate today passed the most significant piece of legislation to protect new Wild and Scenic Rivers in over five years.  With the Senate passing legislation identical to a bill passed by the U.S House last week Congress can agree on something—river protections are good public policy when… Read more »

Colorado Water Plan – Don’t leave healthy ecosystems out to dry

Upper Colorado River, CO | Ken Neubecker On November 19th the Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB) reviewed and approved the draft Colorado Water Plan.  With that and a few “tweaks”, the 385-page document will be sent to the Governor’s office for his review by December 10.  This isn’t the end of the process though.  The… Read more »

One Step Closer to Permanent Protection

M. Fork Snoqualmie River | Thomas O’Keefe Three wild, free-flowing rivers in Washington State are one step closer to permanent protection under the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act: the Middle Fork Snoqualmie and Pratt rivers and Illabot Creek. The U.S. House of Representatives voted on Thursday, December 4th to pass the National Defense Authorization Act… Read more »

A Tribute to Martin Litton, River Hero

Martin Litton | John Blaustein A hero for wild rivers passed away Sunday. One of the original river guides in the Grand Canyon, Martin Litton, 97, was a passionate advocate for wild places and was at the center of some of our country’s biggest river conservation victories. He helped stop the construction of new dams… Read more »

Forever Grateful for Wild and Scenic Rivers

Middle Fork Snoqualmie River | Wendy McDermott What does it mean to be grateful? To me, it means having the gratitude and appreciation for what positively affects my life. Family and friends certainly top the list, as does the beauty and serenity of our nation’s free-flowing rivers, primeval forests, desert canyons and wilderness areas, all… Read more »

Best Rivers in the Fall: NW – CA – SW

Today’s post is a guest blog by Taylor Cox. Taylor is a communications intern at American Rivers this fall. She is majoring in Communication, Law, Economics, and Government (CLEG) with a minor in Environmental Science at American University. It’s Autumn, which has American Rivers staff thinking of their favorite rivers to see the season’s colors…. Read more »

Rivers Divide Us?

At American Rivers, our slogan is Rivers Connect Us, to one another and to nature. But recently, as I paddled with a small group of friends in canoes 80 miles down the Rio Grande through Big Bend National Park, where the river forms the border between the United States and Mexico, I reflected on how… Read more »

A Canyon to Linger In

Today’s post on the Disappearing Rio Grande Expedition is a guest blog by reporter Colin McDonald. Read more about the expedition here. Paddling into the canyon | Colin McDonald The 1,500-foot sheer walls of Santa Elena Canyon have been a mainstay of river guides along the Rio Grande for generations. The massive, immovable layers of… Read more »

The Yampa as a Model for What’s Possible

There are simply not that many wild rivers in the Colorado River Basin. By wild I mean rivers that are not controlled or diverted to other basins – rivers that fill with torrents of raging muddy brown water during spring floods providing nourishment to valleys below – rivers that provide a varied, unique and unparalleled… Read more »

Colorado Water Plan – The Importance of a New Tension

There is nothing more important for Colorado’s future than water. Given that, few things are more critical than the current effort to create a statewide Colorado Water Plan. In 2013, Governor Hickenlooper instructed the Colorado Water Conservation Board to conduct a two-year long planning process to develop a codified approach for how to manage our… Read more »