Green Roofs – My Ah-Ha Moment

Standing with Barbara Deutsch on the green roof at Casey Trees here in Washington, DC, I had my ah-ha moment. Now, Gary has done a great job of explaining what a green roof is and how it works, but I needed to experience one for myself. So we went on a green roof mini-tour visiting… Read more »

House Subcommittee Approves Sewage Legislation

Washington, DC — Every year, more than 860 billion gallons of raw and partially treated sewage lands in America’s waters, and most people have no idea. Today, lawmakers in the House took an important step towards changing that. The Water Resources and Environment Subcommittee of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee overwhelmingly approved bipartisan legislation that… Read more »

Saving the Sound, One Watershed at a Time

Everyday, I look out my window and see Fishermen’s Terminal, a hub for boats of all types: commercial fishing boats, small cruise ships, and other vessels. The boats docked at Fishermen’s Terminal are floating on freshwater and just around the corner the boats use the Ballard Locks to enter the saltwater of Puget Sound. Yesterday’s… Read more »

Global Warming in the Great Lakes

I know that global warming is big and bad and will reshape our world – but for me, it really becomes tangible when I can understand how it will affect specific places. As Gary wrote last week, the Great Lakes are one of those places where we work and that inspire a great sense of… Read more »

Great Lakes – An Environmental History Lesson

While my colleagues and I write and make videos on rain gardens, rain barrels, the importance of addressing stormwater pollution, and in general using green infrastructure to improve our rivers, I think it’s important to keep in mind why we do this. Ask anybody who is involved in conservation, whether it’s their job, they participate… Read more »

Paving Paradise with PAH Parking Lots

Instead of plodding through D.C.’s slushy streets one weekend back in December, I was happily swimming in Austin’s Barton Springs during a trip with my sister, Rachel. Swimming outside in December is a rarity, but as a spring fed pool the water there stays at about 70 degrees year round, good enough even for me,… Read more »

Give A Green Boost To The Economy

This post by American Rivers President Rebecca Wodder originally appeared on Treehugger.com: What our economy needs right now is a whole lot of green: Green jobs, green projects and green investments that will boost local economies while improving our environment and quality of life. (read Katherine’s post, Ring Around the (Green) Collar) Congress is looking… Read more »

Ring Around the (Green) Collar

I was folding laundry and listening to one of the Presidential debates the other night – not listening too closely as the candidates were mostly squabbling. Suddenly, I heard one of them say “green infrastructure” and then another said “green jobs.” I looked up from my unmatched socks – were the candidates really talking green… Read more »

Go Green — New Infrastructure

Buffers, wetlands, and green roofs, hooray! Green infrastructure, the use of soil and plants to filter and treat water on-site, is really catching on. This includes preserving natural landscape features like streamside buffer zones as well as well as recreating landscape features by using techniques like rain gardens and swales. Green infrastructure works to help… Read more »

Rain Garden Tips: Design

So far in our video series we have talked about winter rain gardens, where to put your rain garden, and evaluating your soil. Today’s post will focus on designing your rain garden. Patricia Pennell of the West Michigan Environmental Council (home to Rain Gardens of West Michigan) wrote a little bit to accompany her video… Read more »