The STOPS Runoff Act: Treating Stormwater Where it Falls

Last week, Senator Cardin introduced the STOPS Runoff Act (S. 3602) that will reduce polluted stormwater runoff from federally funded highway and road projects. Roads are a major source of polluted stormwater runoff because rainwater that falls is unable to infiltrate these hard surfaces and soak into the ground. Instead, this water runs along the surface of… Read more »

Going Green for Clean Water

The “streamscape” of my childhood memories is one of fallen log bridges, hidden treasure, and secret trails. Although my local creek was hardly pristine, it was bordered by woods and filled with fish and tadpoles, a place where my friends and I spent many hours exploring, mapping, and making our own. These days, as I… Read more »

Senator Udall Introduces Green Infrastructure Bill

As I stood outside a metro stop, waiting under an overhang as the rain poured down during one of the District’s hot summer thunderstorms, I watched as water slowly began rising in the street. After about five minutes, cars were swerving to avoid the water that lapped up to the height of the curb. This… Read more »

North Carolina’s Failing Falls Lake

I’ve been engaged over the past six months on the rules proposed for cleaning of a water supply for almost a million North Carolinians – Falls Lake.  It is the source of clean drinking water for the city of Raleigh and some of the surrounding towns in Wake County.  It was built by the US… Read more »

Extra! Extra! Climate Change is here!

It’s official. Climate change is here and it’s high time we did something about it. These are the conclusions from a series of reports released earlier this week by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). The three reports focus on the state of climate science and strategies for limiting and adapting to climate change. They find,… Read more »

A 21st Century Flood Management Strategy for the Southeast

(Washington, DC) –  American Rivers voiced support today for efforts to help communities across Tennessee, Kentucky and Mississippi recover from recent floods and released a four point plan to prevent dangerous and damaging floods in the future. In Tennessee, after heavy rains dumped over 13 inches on May 1 and 2, Cumberland and Tennessee River… Read more »

No More Sewer Lines to Nowhere — EPA Adopts Fix-it-First Policy

Many of our older cities have leaking and broken water pipes that leak and sometimes dump raw sewage into our streams and rivers posing threats to public health and limiting livability. Despite massive funding shortfalls, until now, federal funding could be used to subsidize sprawl by sending water and sewer lines to new areas before fixing… Read more »

Getting Serious about Climate Change Adaptation

The climate change headlines haven’t been very encouraging lately. Climate and energy legislation is going nowhere fast in Congress. While the House of Representatives passed a comprehensive bill last June, the Senate has been unable to secure the votes for a similar bill. Efforts by Senators John Kerry, Lindsey Graham, and Joe Lieberman stalled last… Read more »

Green Infrastructure as Modern Art: Sustaining Our Cities

My colleague Stacey was intrigued after hearing a piece on about the nexus of modern art and sustainable urban design. She writes: Barry Bergdoll, the a curator at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, discussed a new exhibit called “Rising Currents: Projects for New York’s Waterfront,”which brings artists and architects together to present their solutions… Read more »