Managing Stormwater for Safe Swimming

Fish kill on the Choptank River in Maryland, a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay | © eutrophication&hypoxia Here on the east coast we’re in the midst of a heat wave and some of our major waterways are unsafe for a cool swim. At Jones Falls in Baltimore’s inner-harbor hundreds of fish are dying. Experts are… Read more »

Investing In Clean Rivers For A Healthy Chesapeake Bay: New Report

Cities and counties in the Bay states are behind schedule implementing permit controls to reduce stormwater runoff | © Jayme Frye The Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF) has released a new report, “Polluted Runoff: How Investing in Runoff Pollution Control Systems Improves the Chesapeake Bay Region’s Ecology, Economy and Health.” Storm event runoff pollutes thousands of… Read more »

Green Infrastructure Proposed to Clean the Susquehanna

Susquehanna Reading Railroad Bridge | Jayme Frye The Susquehanna River, the Chesapeake Bay’s largest tributary will be a little cleaner as a result of last week’s agreement amongst the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, the City of Harrisburg and the authority that manages the area’s stormwater, drinking water and wastewater,… Read more »

A Story From the South Carolina Flooding

Predictions of more frequent and more extreme storms are no longer a theoretical debate for climate scientists: we are living it. Here’s one personal account of Hurricane Joaquin.

New Federal Guidelines for Water Projects Give Overdue Recognition of Need for New Approach

Washington – American Rivers today welcomed the release of the Obama Administration’s updated federal guidelines for water infrastructure investments. Bob Irvin, President of American Rivers, made the following statement: “The new guidelines are a long overdue recognition that the old ways of treating our nation’s rivers are insufficient for the demands of the 21st century.  The old… Read more »

House Subcommittee Approves Sewage Legislation

Washington, DC — Every year, more than 860 billion gallons of raw and partially treated sewage lands in America’s waters, and most people have no idea. Today, lawmakers in the House took an important step towards changing that. The Water Resources and Environment Subcommittee of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee overwhelmingly approved bipartisan legislation that… Read more »

Report: New water supply reservoirs risky ventures in the Southeast

Washington – Southeast U.S. communities should think twice before building new water supply reservoirs, according to a report released today by American Rivers. The report, Money Pit: The High Cost and High Risk of Water Supply Reservoirs in the Southeast, documents the financial risks and water resource risks tied to the development of new reservoirs… Read more »

Ecosystem-based climate adaptation at the World Bank?

“An essential component of adaptation is the protection and restoration of ecosystems and the habitats, natural resources, and services they provide.” You’re probably assuming this quote was lifted from American Rivers’ latest report on climate adaptation, right? If you’ve been paying attention to our work for the past few years, this is a common refrain:… Read more »

Green Infrastructure Working for North Carolina

Guest blog post by Jessie Allen, American Rivers’ volunteer NC Research Associate Green infrastructure practices are gaining popularity as more cities and towns begin to look for innovative ways to effectively manage stormwater. The benefits of green infrastructure practices are clear: less water pollution, cleaner air, and greater energy efficiency, but there are still a… Read more »

North Carolina – Opening the Door to Green Infrastructure

On the last day of June NC Governor Beverly Perdue signed into law a bill that will begin the process of cleaning up the popular Jordan Lake in the Research Triangle area of NC.  The lake was in trouble from day one with predictions of high pollution levels if the US Army Corps of Engineers… Read more »