Preparing for Climate Change: Massachusetts

 Earlier this fall, Massachusetts released its Climate Change Adaptation Report. Following in the footsteps of many other states, such as Wisconsin, Maryland, Oregon, Pennsylvania and Washington, Massachusetts’ report analyzes strategies to adapt to a changing climate across many sectors from natural resources to infrastructure and the economy. The Adaptation Report is organized in two parts;… Read more »

Swimming in Slime Underscores Need for Smart Clean Water Protections

Green slime covering up your local swimming hole?  Seems that Senator Inhofe (R-OK) found his own Grand Lake covered in algae. After swimming in the muck, the Senator became really sick. Blue-green algae are known to cause respiratory illness, skin irritation and diarrhea and tend to flourish in times of drought when water is warm… Read more »

Investing in Resilient Infrastructure after Superstorm Sandy

A guest blog written by communications intern Johannes Dreisbach. Post-Sandy flooding in Matnoloking, NJ | Greg Thompson, USFWS When Superstorm Sandy hit the East Coast in early November, it wreaked unprecedented destruction.   In addition to flooding streets and subway tunnels, uprooting trees, damaging cars and houses, and injuring and killing residents of the area,… Read more »

Preparing Utilities for a Changing Climate

Green roof in Philadelphia, PA | © Leonel Ponce In the last two years, we have seen a record number of extreme weather events including floods, heat waves, droughts, fires and snowstorms. In 2011, 14 different extreme weather events resulted in damages of more than $1 billion each. That trend has shown no signs of… Read more »

Who is Supporting the Bill that Could Hurt Your Rivers?

Why is the ski industry is pushing a bill that could dry up rivers, damage fish and wildlife habitat, and hurt boating and fishing nationwide? Representatives Scott Tipton (R-Colo.) and Jared Polis (D-Colo.) introduced HR 3189, the so called “Water Rights Protection Act.” This bill was supposed to be a minor “fix” for a narrow… Read more »

Announcing America’s Most Endangered Rivers of 2014!

#1 Most Endangered River is the San Joaquin, CA | © Sarah Craig The time has come! Today, American Rivers is announcing our report on America’s Most Endangered Rivers® of 2014! And the Most Endangered River in the nation this year is: SAN JOAQUIN RIVER (California)! Outdated water management and excessive diversions, compounded by the… Read more »

Dams are problem creators, not problem solvers

Removal of Glines Canyon Dam on the Elwha River – August 15, 2014 | NPS What will 3,700 more new dams do that 48,000 existing ones haven’t already done? Invite more problems. According to a new study done by researchers in Europe, the 3,700 new dams under construction or planned for construction around the world… Read more »

Restoring Meadows Like Beavers Lives Depend On It

Measuring the beaver dams | Max Odland “Four point six feet,” I say, pulling a stadia rod out of the water and back onto the inflatable kayak, “but I think it’s deeper over there.” I’m measuring the depth of a beaver pond in a Sierra Nevada meadow that American Rivers is restoring this summer. I… Read more »

American Rivers and NHA Pleased to Host Workshop on Climate Change and Hydropower

Washington, DC — American Rivers and the National Hydropower Association (NHA) are pleased to host today’s joint workshop, “Climate Change and Hydropower Management: Is Existing Science Useful Yet?” The event features representatives from scientific organizations, conservation groups, industry, academics, and regulators.  Topics include: An Overview of Science and Regional Impacts Models and Approaches Using Climate Projections… Read more »